About Cancers

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All Cancers



All Cancers

Cancer in Canada
Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada and is responsible for 30% of all deaths.

  • 2 out of 5 Canadians (45% of men and 41% of women) are expected to develop cancer during their lifetimes.
  • 1 out of 4 Canadians (29% of men and 24% of women) is expected to die from cancer.

An estimated 191,300 new cases of cancer and 76,600 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2014. (The number of estimated new cases does not include 76,100 new non-melanoma skin cancer cases.)

It is estimated that in 2014:

  • 97,700 Canadian men will be diagnosed with cancer and 40,000 men will die from cancer.
  • 93,600 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cancer and 36,600 women will die from cancer.
  • On average, 524 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer every day.
  • On average, 210 Canadians will die from cancer every day.

Lung, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer are the most common types of cancer in Canada (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer). Based on 2014 estimates:

  • These cancers account for over half (52%) of all new cancer cases.
  • Prostate cancer accounts for about one-quarter (24%) of all new cancer cases in men.
  • Lung cancer accounts for 14% of all new cases of cancer.
  • Breast cancer accounts for about one-quarter (26%) of all new cancer cases in women.
  • Colorectal cancer accounts for 13% of all new cancer cases.

Cancer in Ontario
In 2014, an estimated 28,100 people will die of cancer in Ontario, and 73,800 new cases will be diagnosed.

Cancer statistics for men in Ontario For men in Ontario, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2014:

  • An estimated 9,600 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.
  • An estimated 4,900 men will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.
  • An estimated 4,500 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer.

For men in Ontario, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. In 2014:

  • An estimated 3,600 men will die of lung cancer.
  • An estimated 1,900 men will die of colorectal cancer.
  • An estimated 1,500 men will die of prostate cancer.

Cancer statistics for women in Ontario
For women in Ontario, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2014:

  • An estimated 9,500 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • An estimated 4,300 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer.
  • An estimated 4,000 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

For women in Ontario, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. In 2014:

  • An estimated 3,300 women will die of lung cancer.
  • An estimated 1,950 women will die of breast cancer.
  • An estimated 1,500 women will die of colorectal cancer.

Breast Cancer

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Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women. 1 in 9 Canadian women are expected to develop breast cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 30 will die from it.

Gynecologic Cancers - Uterine, Cervical, Ovarian, Vulvar Cancer

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1,450 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer, 6,000 will be diagnosed with uterine cancer, and 2,700 will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

Colon, Rectal and Gastrointestinal, Prostate, Testicular, Bladder and Genitourinary Cancer

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Colorectal and Gastrointestinal Cancers

24,400 Canadians will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2014, representing nearly 13% of all new cancer cases in 2014.

Endocrine
In 2010, 124 Canadians died from endocrine system related cancers. Because these cancers are so rare, prognosis is not well known.

Kidney

It is estimated that in 2014, 6,000 Canadians will be diagnosed with kidney cancer and 1,750 Canadians will die from kidney cancer.

  • 3,800 men will be diagnosed with kidney cancer and 1,100 will die from it.
  • 2,300 women will be diagnosed with kidney cancer and 660 will die from it.

Prostate, Testicular, Bladder and Genitourinary
1,000 Canadian men will be diagnosed with testicular cancer, 23,600 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 6,000 men will be diagnosed with bladder cancer.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among Canadian men. On average, 11 Canadian men die every day from prostate cancer.

Pancreatic Cancer

  • Affects men and women equally, Pancreatic Cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Canada
  • According to the Canadian Cancer Society, an estimated 4,700 new cases of pancreatic cancer will be diagnosed in 2014 and 4,400 will die
  • Pancreatic cancer remains the only one of the top ten cancers with a five year survival rate still in the single digits, with only about 6-8 percent of patients living at least five years after diagnosis.

Head and Neck, Brain, Central Nervous System, Eye, Skin and Melanoma, Endocrine Cancer

Head and Neck, Brain, Central Nervous System

Head and Neck
Nearly 4,300 Canadians are diagnosed with head and neck cancers every year. Men are three times more likely to develop head and neck cancer than women. Nearly 75% of head and neck cancers are caused by tobacco and alcohol use.

Brain, Central Nervous System, and Eye
In the first year after brain cancer diagnosis, it is estimated that the average patient will make 52 visits to their health care team. An estimated 55,000 Canadians are living with brain tumours. Eye cancer is rare. Each year, approximately 355 Canadians are diagnosed with eye cancer:

  • 185 men were diagnosed with eye cancer.
  • 170 women were diagnosed with eye cancer

Skin Cancer and Melanoma
It is estimated that in 2014 6,500 Canadians will be diagnosed with melanoma and 1,050 Canadians will die from melanoma.

  • 3,500 men will be diagnosed with melanoma and 660 will die from it.
  • 3,000 women will be diagnosed with melanoma and 400 will die from it.
  • 80-90% of skin cancer cases are caused by ultraviolet radiation.

Lymphoma Cancer

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Lymphoma

1,450 men and 1,200 women will eventually die from lymphoma. It is estimated that in 2014 8,000 Canadians will be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 2,600 Canadians will die from non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  • 4,400 men will be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 1,450 will die from it.
  • 3,600 women will be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 1,200 will die from it.

Leukaemia

One Canadian is diagnosed with a blood cancer every twenty eight minutes. 5,900 Canadians will be diagnosed with leukaemia and 2,700 will die from it.



Childhood Cancers

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Childhood Cancers

There are nearly 10,000 children living with cancer in Canada today. The most common types of childhood cancers are leukaemia, lymphoma, and brain and spinal cord. Leukaemia and lymphoma account for almost half of all childhood cancers. Due to advances in cancer therapy treatments, 78% of children will survive five years or more. In Canada, childhood cancers are responsible for more deaths in one year than any other adolescent disease.

  • Radiation therapy is a critical treatment for children with cancer and The Princess Margaret has the largest pediatric radiation program in Canada
  • As a partner with SickKids, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre participates in numerous Children’s Oncology Group clinical trials and is involved in leading research in the field


Lung Cancer, Sarcoma

Lung Cancer Diagnose

Lung
On average, 72 Canadians are diagnosed with lung cancer every day. 47% of new lung cancer cases were between 20 and 69 years of age.

Sarcoma
More than half of soft tissue sarcomas begin in the arm or leg. In 2010, 1175 Canadians were diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma.

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September 12, 2015

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